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Thursday, April 30, 2020 | History

3 edition of Productivity effects of cropland erosion in the United States found in the catalog.

Productivity effects of cropland erosion in the United States

Pierre R. Crosson

Productivity effects of cropland erosion in the United States

  • 231 Want to read
  • 17 Currently reading

Published by Resources for the Future in Washington, D.C .
Written in English

    Places:
  • United States.
    • Subjects:
    • Soil erosion -- United States.,
    • Soil productivity -- United States.,
    • Crops and soils -- United States.,
    • Crop yields -- United States.

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographies and index.

      StatementPierre R. Crosson with Anthony T. Stout.
      ContributionsStout, Anthony T.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsS624.A1 C76 1983
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxii, 103 p. :
      Number of Pages103
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL3176656M
      ISBN 100801832071
      LC Control Number83019094

        The JRC noted that decreasing productivity can be observed on 20% of the world’s cropland, 16% of forest land, 19% of grassland, and 27% of rangeland. “Industrial agriculture is good at. The effects of water erosion (including long-term historical erosion and single erosion event) on soil properties and productivity in different farming systems were investigated. A typical sloping cropland with homogeneous soil properties was designed in and then protected from other external disturbances except natural water erosion. In , this cropland was divided in three . Abstract. Environmental Effects of Conservation Practices on Grazing Lands, Special Reference Briefs U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library. This bibliography is one in a multi-volume set developed by the Water Quality Information Center at the National Agricultural Library in support of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Conservation Effects .


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Productivity effects of cropland erosion in the United States by Pierre R. Crosson Download PDF EPUB FB2

Productivity Effects Productivity effects of cropland erosion in the United States book Cropland Erosion in the United States. Productivity Effects of Cropland Erosion in the United States book. Originally published inthis study investigates the threats to crop productivity in the U.S.

with a focus on human-made problems. This title will be of interest to students of environmental by: Productivity effects of cropland erosion in the United States. Washington, D.C.: Resources for the Future, (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Pierre R Crosson; Anthony T Stout.

Productivity Effects of Cropland Erosion in the United States (Routledge Revivals) - Kindle edition by Pierre R. Crosson. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets.

Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Productivity Effects of Cropland Erosion in the United States (Routledge Revivals).Cited by: Read "Productivity Effects of Cropland Erosion in the United States" by Pierre R. Crosson available from Rakuten Kobo.

In the ’s, agriculture in the United States seemed to be booming. With an extra demand for crops, extra acres were t Brand: Taylor And Francis. Book: Productivity effects of cropland erosion in the United States.

pp pp. Abstract: The following are discussed: (a) the historical background, (b) soil characteristics, Productivity effects of cropland erosion in the United States book erosion Subject Category: Natural ProcessesCited by: 1.

Genre/Form: Electronic books: Additional Physical Format: Print version: Crosson, Pierre R. Productivity effects of cropland erosion in the United States. Soil erosion involves the breakdown, detachment, transport, and redistribution of soil particles by forces of water, wind, or gravity.

Soil erosion on cropland is of particular interest because of its on-site impacts on soil quality and crop productivity, and its off-site impacts on water quantity and quality, air quality, and biological activity.

The effects of erosion are also felt elsewhere in the environment. A recent study estimated the off-site cost of cropland erosion in the United States to be in the range of a billion dollars per year (Clark, Haverkamp, and Chapman ).

Agronomic implications of soil erosion by water in the United States have been derived mainly from limited research on Mollisols, Alfisols, and Ultisols. Because cultivated Ultisols of the southeastern USA are thinner and suffer problems associated with subsoil acidity, crop yield reductions appear more permanent and difficult to restore.

Erosion and Productivity of Soils Containing Rock Fragments to be increasingly used for food and fiber production with the ever present potential of undesirable effects of wind and water erosion. Table of Contents Classification and Distribution of Soils Containing Rock Productivity effects of cropland erosion in the United States book in the United States (Pages: ) F.

Miller. erosion because many farming practices remove the protective vegetative cover. The United Productivity effects of cropland erosion in the United States book Department of Agriculture (USDA) has estimated soil erosion and has addressed erosion issues since the ’s. This paper discusses the impact of soil erosion and presents USDA data on soil erosion on cropland in the United States from to Cited by: 2.

ways that erosion reduces productivity, these four are the most important. Evi- dence of productivity loss caused by ero- sion exists throughout the United States.

Many once-productive fields have not been cultivated for years because severe erosion made. SOIL EROSION AND CROP PRODUCTIVITY Editors R. Follett and B. Stewart Consulting Editor Iris Y. Ballew Managing Editor Domenic A. Fuccillo. Human induced soil erosion and associated damage to all agricultural land over many years have resulted in the loss of valuable agricultural land due to abandonment and reduced productivity of the remaining land which is partly made up for by the addition of nitrogen and phosphate fertilizers [2,9,10,11].This loss of cropland to the effects of soil erosion often results in the creation of Cited by: The MPI (Duan et al., ) was used to quantitively evaluate the effects of soil erosion on soil productivity with reference to the soil's physical and chemical properties, taking into account model applicability and data availability.

The purposes of the study were to 1) quantitatively evaluate soil productivity in China's black soil region Cited by: The rates of soil erosion that exceed the generation of new topsoil are a dynamic process which leads to decline in the soil productivity, low agricultural yield and income.

The soil erosion rates, derived from the RUSLE model, are used to estimate the loss in crop productivity (physical change in the production of plants) and to model their impact on the. Probability plots of rates of soil erosion from agricultural fields under conventional (e.g., tillage) and conservation agriculture (e.g., terracing and no-till methods), with erosion rates from areas and plots under native vegetation, rates of soil production, and geologic rates of erosion (a composite distribution of the data for cratons, soil-mantled landscapes, and alpine Cited by: Effects of Soil Erosion on Soil Properties as Related to Crop Productivity and Classification W.

Em Larson University of Minnesota St. Paul, Minnesota T. Fenton Io wa State University Ames, Iowa Em La Skidmore Agricultural Research Service U.

Department of Agriculture Man hattan, Kansas C. Ma Benbrook National Academy of Sciences. The relatively few studies that have focused on a variety of soils in the United States have been helpful in establishing the range of vulnerabil- ity to different erosion rates.

However, many of these past studies are less useful in assessing contemporary erosion-productivity relation- ships (see Separating the Effects of Erosion and Technology). The descriptions of several erosion-productivity models such as EPIC, NTRM, PI model and the Y-SLS were included in the literature.

These models were developed in the United States to estimate the long term effects of erosion on crop productivity. The individual models have slightly different applications. Scientists at the U.S. Department of Agriculture are developing research-based technologies to help farmers increase productivity and production efficiency while practicing sustainable agriculture.

Importance of Crop Production. Field and forage crops are grown on most of the million acres of harvested cropland in the United States. The United States has continued investing ever since.

From the early days of government assistance until the early ’s, conservation was promoted largely by EITS (education, information, technology, and subsidies). EITS worked largely because information was difficult to come by and erosion appeared to be undermining productivity.

An analysis of several studies on the effect of soil erosion on crop yields in the United States concluded that for each 1 inch of topsoil lost, wheat and corn yields declined by 6 percent.

A USDA Natural Resource Inventory, which measured the loss of topsoil from U.S. cropland at billion tons per year, found that excess erosion was.

Soil Erosion: Long-Term Erosion of our Productive Farmland Base from U.S. Population Growth Page 3.

In just the 28 years from tomillion that the overall amount of cropland in the United States decreased from million acres in to million. Size: KB. nificant only- in the Great Plains States, and that gully and streambank erosion do not affect cropland significantly.

Thus, total cropland erosion is the sum of sheet and rill erosion plus Great Plains wind erosion, or billion tons a year. This is an average of 7 tons per acre each year for the Nation’s total million cropland acres.

Wind erosion is a serious threat to food security and contributes to the degradation of a sustainable agriculture in the United States and throughout the world.

In addition, dust storms affect air quality and airborne dust has significant economic, health, ecological, and. Keywords: Soil productivity soil erodibility soil erosion policy, U.S. cropland, land capability classification, prime farmland definition.

Sales Information Purchase copies of this report from ERS/NASS Reports, RO. BoxRock- ville, MD Order Productivity and Erodibility of U.S. Cropland, AER   There are about million acres ( million hectares) of cropland in the United States where the annual soil-erosion rate exceeds the soil-loss tolerance rate (USDA, NRCS, b).

Figure shows the spatial variability of cropland erosion in the United States. The situation, however, is very different in other parts of the world. Continues Brand: Terrence J. Toy. erosion effects on soil loss and, subsequently, on crop yields.

In the procedure, a wind-erosion equation is used to predict potential annual loss, which is converted to crop-yield reduction per centimeter of erosion for wheat, grain sorghum, and corn.

Where applied in the Oklahoma Panhandle (in 2 1/4 counties), the procedureCited by: new water sources. The costs and environmental effects of development would be prohibitive. As the largest water user in the United States, irrigation—of agriculture, turf, and landscapes—must seek ways to conserve.

This will require a variety of technologies. Research goals— • To develop technology that quantifies and controls a. Written by the foremost authorities in the field, this volume brings together the technical papers from which Volume 1 is drawn. The 10 papers and discussion from a National Research Council symposium cover such topics as soil erosion classification, evaluating how soil erosion damages productivity, calculating soil erosion, understanding ephemeral gully erosion, wind erosion, and.

the oceans and other aquatic ecosystems. Each year about 10 million ha of cropland are lost due to soil erosion, thus reducing the cropland available for food production. The loss of cropland is a serious problem because the World Health Organization reports that more than billion people are mal-nourished in the world.

A recent study estimated the off-site cost of cropland erosion in the United States to be in the range of a billion dollars per year (Clark, Haverkamp, and Chapman ). cal, and biological components of cropland and rangeland ecosystems.

Land productivity varies from site to site and changes over time. It interacts with the other components of agricultural productivity, which are the productivity of capital, the productiv-ity of labor, and the state of the art of technol-ogy.

Because of these interactions. Cropland agriculture affects vast areas of the Columbia River Basin (Figure ) although this activity is perhaps most concentrated on arid basalt plateaus and Palouse prairie country where surface waters are comprehensive review of the effects of cropland agriculture on fish habitat in the Columbia Basin exists, as far as we know, but the NRC found that dewatering.

Productivity Effects of Cropland Erosion in the United In the ’s, agriculture in the United States seemed to be booming. With an extra demand for crops, extra acres were taken on to increase production which was predicted to increase further with Pages:   Sincethe agricultural sector’s contribution to Gross Domestic Product has declined, possibly because of the negative effects of land degradation i.e.

soil erosion challenges among others. The paper assesses the cost of land or soil degradation in the Agricultural Sector and its effect on the economy of Ghana with focus on the on-site Cited by: 1. Book: Determinants of Soil Loss Tolerance, ASA Special Publicat The process has been slowed down or even halted in most of Europe, Canada, the United States, Australia, South Africa, South Korea, the Soviet Union, China, and Chile, and a few other countries.

Soil Erosion Effects on Soil Productivity of Cultivated Cropland. soil erosion for four crops that have been the subject of most erosion–productivity studies in North America: maize (Zea mays L.), wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), soybeans [Glycine max (L.) Merr.], and cotton (Gossypium spp.

L.). A number of studies have investigated productivity effects of erosion on other crops, but they. Continuous soil erosion has caused pdf land degradation in the black pdf area of Northeast China. The primary objective of this study was to determine the effects of accelerated erosion on soil productivity, as measured by soybean (Glycine max L.

Merr.) yields. Eight erosion levels, 0, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, and 70 cm, were simulated by imitating the integrated process Cited by: In the United States, the annual cost of soil erosion for both on-site and off-site effects has been estimated at 44 billion dollars a year (Pimentel et al., ).

In the European Union, the figure is 38 billion Euros a year (Montanarella, ).Background: Soil erosion is a major threat to soil health and agricultural productivity, with 10 million ebook of ebook lost each year to erosive processes.

1 Global soil loss is estimated to be occurring at 10 to 40 times the rate of formation. 1 Soil erosion is driven primarily by moving water and wind, though slumps may occur due to gravity. Bare and sloping soils are particularly.